When the United States put immigration barriers for Tech professionals, they headed to Canada

Posted on December 21, 2017

As United States President, Donald Trump is cracking down on the immigration of high-tech workers through H1-B visas; Justin Trudeau’s Global Skills Strategy is increasing by leaps and bounds. Over 2000 workers have been employed in Canada from June to September 2017 solely through Global Skills Strategy-says the government data. For this program, Computer programmers, Software Engineers and System Analysts have been the most popular occupation categories so far.

A big data processing firm, ThinkData Works Inc. hired a Software Engineer from Brazil through Canada Global Skills Strategy. The Chief Executive Officer of this Toronto based company quotes his experience “The process was bang on. It took less than the government’s target of 10 business days to process the recruit’s application. Previously it could take several months. If the government says two weeks and it actually is, that will create a whole new process around it.”

In the similar context, Canada’s Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen expressed his joy over a telephonic interview by saying, “It’s more successful than we predicted,” “This program came from the business community. They identified a challenge and said you need to fix it.”

The good news to add is nearly 988 Indian Tech professionals were hired through this fast-track program. This accounts for the highest number (50%) of all nationalities entering Canada through this program in a span of just four months. To amazement, India had also been a country of tech professionals who received the largest of H1B visas in a year- next to being China and France. Statistic reflects that Indian applications to the annual lottery for US visas dropped drastically for the first time in five years. Certainly, this indicates the tables turning down for the United States. Tech professionals who once urged to settle in the United States, considering the restrictive approach are now pulled towards Canada.

Canada’s fast-track visa programme is just one part of Trudeau’s drive to boost innovation. The government is also pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into venture capital and support for artificial intelligence, joining private money investing in the country’s tech hubs in Waterloo and Toronto, Ontario, Vancouver and Montreal, says a statement in Times of India Business.